ECE 110 - Introduction to Electronics

Semesters Offered

Official Description

Introduction to selected fundamental concepts and principles in electrical engineering. Emphasis on measurement, modeling, and analysis of circuits and electronics while introducing numerous applications. Includes sub-discipline topics of electrical and computer engineering, for example, electromagnetics, control, signal processing, microelectronics, communications, and scientific computing basics. Lab work incorporates sensors and motors into an autonomous moving vehicle, designed and constructed to perform tasks jointly determined by the instructors and students. Class Schedule Information: Students must register for one lab and one lecture section. 1 hour of credit may be given for the lab taken alone with approval of the department.

Prerequisites

Credit or concurrent registration in MATH 220 or MATH 221

Subject Area

Core Curriculum

Course Directors

Description

Integrated introduction to selected fundamental concepts and principles in electrical and computer engineering: circuits, electromagnetics, communications, electronics, controls, and computing. Laboratory experiments and lectures focus on a design and construction project, such as an autonomous moving vehicle.

Preview ECE 110

Goals

ECE 110 is a freshman engineering course. Its goals are to excite students about the study of electrical and computer engineering by exposing them early in their education to electrical components and their application in systems, and to enhance their problem solving skills through analysis and design.

Topics

  • Introduction
  • DC circuits
  • Electromagnets, DC motors
  • Electronics: Diodes, Transistors
  • Sensors, feedback and control
  • Digital logic
  • Pulse width modulation and communication
  • Basic computer organization

Detailed Description and Outline

ECE 110 is a freshman engineering course. Its goals are to excite students about the study of electrical and computer engineering by exposing them early in their education to electrical components and their application in systems, and to enhance their problem solving skills through analysis and design.

Topics:

  • Introduction
  • DC circuits
  • Electromagnets, DC motors
  • Electronics: Diodes, Transistors
  • Sensors, feedback and control
  • Digital logic
  • Pulse width modulation and communication
  • Basic computer organization

Computer Usage

Tutorials and homework quizzes are on the World Wide Web. Homework problems are computer graded. Students must be able to use a Web browser.

Topical Prerequisities

  • High school physics
  • Credit or registration in calculus I

Texts

Class Notes. Future text to be announced.

ABET Category

Engineering Science: 75%
Engineering Design: 25

Course Goals

The goal of the ECE110 freshman engineering course is to introduce students in their freshman year to the electrical devices and circuits used in modern power and information systems and to simultaneously develop basic modeling and analytical skills that are used to analyze and design such systems. The devices are taught in a historical context, and, for the most part, the analytical skills are limited to simple algebraic and geometric techniques. It is a 4 credit hour lecture/laboratory course in which students learn about electrical instruments, motors, generators, diodes, transistors, amplifiers, digital circuits, microprocessors, sensors, feedback control, and power and information systems. In the lecture the students learn (1) how a number of electrical devices and systems work, (2) how to construct simple mathematical behavioral models for these devices, and (3) how to design and perform simple analyses of circuits and systems containing these devices. In the laboratory the students experiment with various modules containing these devices, and in the final four weeks of the laboratory student teams compete in a design challenge. Currently the challenge is to design an autonomous vehicle capable of navigating a meandering course marked by a white tape.

Instructional Objectives

Fundamentals (1.5 weeks): IEEE Code of Ethics. Understand voltage, current, electrical conduction, Ohm's law, power, energy, and be able to compute electrical power and energy for DC voltages and currents; understand the meaning of and be able to compute average power and the rms value of voltage and current for certain classes of time-varying waveforms. (a,e,f,k,m)

DC Circuit Analysis (2 weeks): be able to apply Kirchhoff's laws to a circuit and to compute the circuit's node voltages using the nodal method. (a,e,k,m)

Equivalent Circuits (1 week): be able to reduce a circuit containing resistors and independent sources to a simple equivalent circuit using series/parallel reduction techniques and the Thevenin and Norton theorems. (a,e,k,m)

Magnetic Devices (1 week): for simple geometries compute, (1) the strength of the magnetic field in an electromagnet, (2) the force on a current carrying conductor in a magnetic field, and (3) the voltage induced across the terminals of a conductor in a time-varying magnetic field; understand the operation of various electromagnetic devices, e.g., relays, motor/generators, and other types of electromagnetic transducers. (a,e,k,m)

Diodes (1 week): understand the operation of the semiconductor diode and be able to construct simple piecewise linear models of a diode's i-v characteristics; analyze and design simple rectifier, voltage regulator, LED, and photodiode circuits. (a,c,e,k,m)

Transistors (2 weeks): understand how current flow is controlled in the BJT and MOS transistors; be able to construct simple piecewise linear models from the input and output characteristics of the common emitter BJT; analyze the switching behavior of the BJT inverter and compute its voltage and current gain in the active region graphically and with piecewise linear models; understand the operation of the CMOS NOR and NAND gates; use a simple switch model to construct the truth tables for CMOS logic gates. (a,c,e,k,m)

Digital Logic (3 weeks): understand the logical operations of basic combinatorial digital circuits, e.g., NOT, OR, AND, NOR, NAND, XOR, MUX, and the comparator; be able to construct the truth table, the Boolean function, and the timing diagram for combinatorial digital logic circuits; design a digital logic circuit from a truth table specification using the sum-of-product method; design a more complex logic circuit from a specified set of simpler logic circuits; minimize simple Boolean expressions using the Boolean identities; be able to convert between binary and decimal numbers and to understand the operation of the full adder circuit and the seven segment display circuit; understand the operation of basic sequential logic circuits, e.g., D-type and JK-type flip-flops, binary counters, and registers. (a,c,e,k,m)

Digital Information and Systems (2 weeks): understand basic concepts of digital information coding, sampling, communication, storage, error detection and correction methods, compression techniques, security, secret encoding, and network architectures. Be able to study potential aliasing problems for signal sampling, and digital imaging. Be able to convert between information and digital coding using ASCII, parity bit techniques, bar codes. Be able to compress information using the Huffman code, and generate the code tree. Be able to code information using famous ciphers, such as the Caesar cipher, or Vigenere cipher. Understand recent developments in computer encryption, and the concept of public key cryptography. Be able to generate a pseudorandom generator sequence (a,e,h,j,k,m).

Invited Speakers (0.5 weeks): understand basic concepts in ongoing research in selected sub-areas of electrical and computer engineering, e.g. nanotechnology, power and energy systems, and biomedical imaging and bioengineering and acoustics, and about future coursework in the major such as senior design. (h,j)

Post Midterm Exam Reviews (1 week): identify sources of confusion and error and common misconceptions on the exam. (a, b, c, e, k, m)

Revised January 2013

Last updated

3/25/2015