ECE 205 - Introduction to Electric and Electronic Circuits

TitleRubricSectionCRNTypeHoursTimesDaysLocationInstructor
Elec & Electronic CircuitsECE205AB139230LAB01100 - 1250 W  4074 ECE Building 
Elec & Electronic CircuitsECE205AB239231LAB01100 - 1250 R  4074 ECE Building 
Elec & Electronic CircuitsECE205AL30390LEC30850 - 0950 MTWRF  2017 ECE Building Zuofu Cheng

Official Description

Basic principles of circuit analysis; transient analysis; AC steady-state analysis; introduction to semiconductor devices and fabrication; digital logic circuits; op-amps; A/D and D/A conversion. Course Information: Credit is not given to Computer or Electrical Engineering majors. Prerequisite: PHYS 212. Class Schedule Information: Students must register for one lecture and one lab.

Subject Area

Core Curriculum

Description

Basic principles of circuit analysis, transient analysis, AC steady-state analysis, introduction to semiconductor devices and fabrication, digital logic circuits, op-amps, and A/D and D/A conversion.

Notes

ECE students may not receive credit for this course.

Goals

This course is designed to give non-majors in engineering an introduction to electric circuits, semiconductor devices, and microelectronic circuits.

Topics

  • Introduction: Charge, current, voltage, power, circuit elements, Ohm's law
  • Kirchhoff's current and voltage laws, voltage and current divisions
  • Node-voltage, mesh-current methods, superposition, and equivalence theorems
  • RC and RL circuits, first-order network, step response
  • Sinusoidal excitation and phasors
  • AC steady-state analysis and AC steady-state power
  • Frequency response, passive filters
  • Semiconductor physics
  • Diodes, diode circuit analysis
  • MOS cicuit analysis
  • MOS logic circuits: nMOS and CMOS
  • BJT circuit analysis
  • BJT logic circuits: RTL, DTL, TTL, and ECL
  • Propagation delay, rise and fall time, and noise margin
  • Op-amps, DAC and ADC

Detailed Description and Outline

This course is designed to give non-majors in engineering an introduction to electric circuits, semiconductor devices, and microelectronic circuits.

Topics:

  • Introduction: Charge, current, voltage, power, circuit elements, Ohm's law
  • Kirchhoff's current and voltage laws, voltage and current divisions
  • Node-voltage, mesh-current methods, superposition, and equivalence theorems
  • RC and RL circuits, time domain analysis, step response
  • RLC circuits time
  • Sinusoidal excitation and phasors
  • AC steady-state analysis and AC steady-state power
  • Frequency response, passive filters
  • Op-Amp - inverting and non-inverting Active Filter
  • Op-Amp- Integrator, Current Source Comparator
  • P-N Junction Diodes
  • Introduction to BJTs
  • Binary Logic and Logic Gates
  • Logic Gates Using BJTs

ECE students may not receive credit for this course.

Topical Prerequisites

  • Physics in electricity and magnetism
  • Differential and integral calculus
  • Linear, ordinary differential equations

Texts

Analog Signals and Systems, Erhan Kudeki and David C. Munson Jr.

ABET Category

Engineering Science: 100%

Course Goals

ECE 205 is an introductory course on circuit analysis and electronics for non-majors in engineering. The goals are to impart the fundamental principles of electric circuits, semiconductor devices, and electronic circuits that constitute the foundation for preparing a non-major to take follow-on courses involving electric and electronic circuits.

Instructional Objectives

At the end of week 4, students should be able to do the following:

  • Calculate the currents and voltages in resistive circuits using Ohm’s law, KCL, KVL, reduction of series and parallel resistances, and voltage and current divisions (a)
  • Find the node voltages in resistive circuits containing current sources and voltage sources using nodal analysis (a)
  • Find the mesh currents and branch currents in resistive circuits containing voltage sources and current sources using mesh analysis (a)
  • Analyze resistive circuits containing multiple sources by using superposition (a)
  • Apply Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems to simplify a resistive circuit by finding the Thevenin or Norton equivalent of a two-terminal network (a)

At the end of week 6, students should be able to do the following:

  • Manipulate complex numbers and understand their meaning
  • Determine the initial conditions of circuits containing capacitors and inductors using capacitor rules and inductor rules (a)
  • Calculate the currents and voltages of a first-order network containing a switch, and find the step response of a first-order network containing a step source (a, m)
  • Calculate the currents and voltages of a first-order network containing a switch, and find the transient of a first-order network containing to a sinusoidal forcing function. (a, m)
  • Calculate the currents and voltages of a second-order network containing a switch, and find the transient response of a second-order network containing a step function. (a, m)

At the end of week 8, students should be able to do the following:

  • Find the phasor voltage (current) for a given sinusoidal voltage (current), and find the sinusoidal voltage (current) for given phasor voltage (current) and frequency (a)
  • Find the impedances of resistors, capacitors, and inductors for a given frequency (a)
  • Analyze a phasor circuit using Ohm’s law, KCL, KVL, reduction of series and parallel impedances, and voltage and current divisions (a) Calculate the phasor voltages and currents in a phasor circuit by applying nodal analysis (a)
  • Find the phasor voltages and currents in a phasor circuit containing multiple sources using superposition (a)
  • Apply Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems to simplify a phasor circuit by finding the Thevenin or Norton equivalent of a two-terminal network (a)
  • Analyze magnetic circuits and circuits containing transformers. (a)

At the end of week 10, students should be able to do the following:

  • Derive and sketch the frequency response of a linear circuit or system. (a, m)
  • Analyze circuits containing Op-amps (ideal)– Differentiators, Integrators, active filters.
  • Calculate the currents and voltages in a circuit containing diodes using the simple constant-voltage model for the diode(s) (a, m)

At the end of week 13, students should be able to do the following:

  • Determine the modes of operation of the BJT and calculate the voltages and currents in a BJT dc circuit, and find the power dissipated by the BJT (a, m)
  • Determine the modes of operation of the BJTs and the on/off condition of the diodes, and calculate the voltages and currents in various simple BJT/diode circuits for given input voltages (a, m)

Last updated

3/29/2017by Chandrasekhar Radhakrishnan