ECE 459
Communications, I

Section Type Times Days Location Instructor
R LCD 0930 - 1050 T R   4026 Electrical & Computer Eng Bldg  Juan Alvarez
Web Page http://courses.engr.illinois.edu/ece459/
Official Description Analog underpinning of analog and digital communication systems: representation of signals and systems in the time and frequency domains; analog modulation schemes; random processes; prediction and noise analysis using random processes; noise sensitivity and bandwidth requirements of modulation schemes. Brief introduction to digital communications. Course Information: Prerequisite: ECE 313.
Subject Area Communications
Course Prerequisites Credit in ECE 313 or STAT 410
Course Directors Tangul Basar
Detailed Description and Outline

To provide an introduction to the fundamentals of analog and sampled data communication systems with emphasis on system architectures, signal-to-noise ratios, and bandwidth requirements of amplitude, frequency, and pulse code modulations techniques.

Topics:

  • Introduction to analog and digital communication systems
  • Signals and filters
  • Random signals and noise
  • Analog modulation techniques
  • Pulse code modulation techniques
  • Digital modulation techniques
Topical Prerequisities
  • Fundamental circuit analysis
  • Fourier and Laplace transform
  • Probability theory
Texts

Fundamentals of Communication Systems, 2nd edition, by Proakis and Salehi, Prentice Hall.

ABET Category

Engineering Science: 2 credits or 67%
Engineering Design: 1 credit or 33%

Course Goals

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of analog and sampled data communication systems with emphasis on system architectures, signal-to-noise ratios, and bandwidth requirements of amplitude, frequency, pulse code modulation techniques. This is the first course in communication systems. It is closely related to and complements the second course ECE 361, Communications II, which focuses on digital communications.

Instructional Objectives

A. By the time of Exam No. I (after 13 lectures), the students should be able to do the following:

1. Apply Fourier transform and its properties for signal transmission through a linear system (a)

2. Describe bandpass signals and systems (a, m)

3. Find the bandwidth of a signal or system (a, e, and k)

4. Identify baseband and modulated signals (a)

5. Write the expressions for amplitude modulated, double side band, single side band, vestigial side band modulated signals, identify their spectrums, and sketch the circuit diagrams for their modulation and demodulation (a, c, e, k and m)

6. Write the expressions for angle modulated signals, and phase and frequency modulated signals. Analyze their spectrums and drive expressions for the

transmission bandwidth. Sketch the circuit diagrams for generations and demodulation of frequency and phase modulated signals (a, c, e, k and m)

7. Analyze phase locked loops. Give the expressions on how it works as a FM demodulator and as a frequency and phase follower (a, b, c, k and m)

B. By the time of Exam No. II (after 30 lectures), the students should be able to do all of the items listed under A, plus the following:

8. Apply hypothesis testing in detection and estimation (a, l)

9. Identify a random signal, obtain the mean, autocorrelation, and autocovariance functions of random processes (a, l)

10. Identify a stationary and wide sense stationary random process (a, l)

11. Find the response of a linear filter to a random process (a, b, c, e, k, l and m)

12. Analyze Gaussian random processes through linear systems. (a, b, e, l and m)

13. Describe power spectral density of random processes (a, b, l, and m)

14. Give the mathematical model of a narrow band random process (a, l and m)

15. Evaluate signal-to-noise ratios for analog modulation schemes (AM, DSB, SSB, VSB, FM and PM) and compare their performances (a, b, c, e, k and l)

C. By the time of the Final Exam (42 lectures + two exams), the students should be able to do all of the items listed under A and B, plus the following:

16. Sample a continuous-time signal, and describe quantization noise in a process (a, b, c, e, k and l)

17. Obtain a Pulse Code Modulated signal, compute signal-to quantization noise ratios for uniform and nonuniform quantizers (a, b, c, e, k and l)

18. Obtain power spectral densities of different line coded signals (on-off, polar, bipolar, Manchester), and compare their bandwidths (a, b, c, e, k and l)

19. Obtain detection error probabilities of different line coded baseband signals, and compare these probabilities (a, b, c, e, k and l)

20. Design an optimum receiver for a polar signal under Gaussian noise environment (a, b, c, e, k, l and m)

Last updated: 6/13/2013 by Amy Hurst