ECE 481
Nanotechnology

Section Type Times Days Location Instructor
C3 LEC 1400 - 1520 T R   260 Everitt Lab  Joseph Lyding
C4 LEC 1400 - 1520 T R   260 Everitt Lab  Joseph Lyding
Web Page http://courses.engr.illinois.edu/ece481/
Official Description Fundamental physical properties of nanoscale systems. Nanofabrication techniques, semiconductor nanotechnology, molecular and biomolecular nanotechnology, carbon nanotechnology (nanotubes and graphene), nanowires, and nanoscale architectures and systems. Course Information: 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: One of CHEM 442, CHBE 457, ME 485, MSE 401, PHYS 460.
Course Prerequisites
Course Directors Joseph W Lyding
Detailed Description and Outline
  • Fundamental physical properties of nanoscale systems
  • Nanofabrication techniques
  • Semiconductor nanotechnology
  • Molecular and biomolecular nanotechnology
  • Carbon nanotechnology (nanotubes and graphene)
  • Nanowires
  • Nanoscale architectures and systems
Computer Usage

Simulations, such as calculating the band structures of carbon nanotubes, will be performed using online simulation tools in NSF's NanoHUB website.

Reports

Students write a term paper on a topic they select. Instructor provides guidance and feedback on topic selection. (Note: Four-hour students do two term papers.)

Students also give a conference format in-class presentation on their term papers. 50% of their presentation grade is determined by peer evaluation. (Note: Four-hour students give a second presentation that is scheduled outside of classroom time.)

A final project in the form of a NSF proposal is due during finals week. There is no in-class final exam. Teams of 4 students are formed to write each final proposal. The proposed topic must be something that has not been done yet. The teams work with the instructor to develop the proposal topic and break it down into sections for the team members.

Topical Prerequisities

Junior or senior level coursework in any science or engineering discipline. Course examples include CHEM 442, CHBE 457, ECE 340, ME 485, MSE 401, PHYS 460.

Texts

No text. All needed materials are provided online through the course website.

References

Course website

Course Goals

The key objective is for students to understand and critically evaluate the nanotechnology field.

Students write a term paper on a topic they select. Instructor provides guidance and feedback on topic selection. (Note: Four-hour students do two term papers.)

Students also give a conference format in-class presentation on their term papers. 50% of their presentation grade is determined by peer evaluation. (Note: Four-hour students give a second presentation that is scheduled outside of classroom time.)

A final project in the form of a NSF proposal is due during finals week. There is no in-class final exam. Teams of 4 students are formed to write each final proposal. The proposed topic must be something that has not been done yet. The teams work with the instructor to develop the proposal topic and break it down into sections for the team members.

Instructional Objectives
  • Basic principles are taught early in the course (a)
  • Followed by critical reviews of the current literature (j,k)
  • Finally, students exercise 'out-of-the-box' thinking by proposing something that has not been done for their final proposals. These proposal are in NSF format to give students experience in relevant future fund-raising endeavors. (j,k,g,h)
  • Students also give in-class, conference format presentations to practice their skill at effectively conveying their thoughts to an audience. (j,k,g,h)
Last updated: 6/17/2013 by Joseph W. Lyding