ECE 342
Electronic Circuits

Section Type Times Days Location Instructor
D LEC 1100 - 1150 M W F   1015 Electrical & Computer Eng Bldg  Ibrahim Hajj
F LEC 1300 - 1350 M W F   1015 Electrical & Computer Eng Bldg  Timothy Trick
Web Page http://courses.engr.illinois.edu/ece342/
Official Description Analysis and design of analog and digital electronic circuits using MOS field effect transistors and bipolar junction transistors, with emphasis on amplifiers in integrated circuits. Course Information: Credit is not given for both ECE 342 and PHYS 404. Prerequisite: ECE 210.
Subject Area Integrated Circuits and Systems
Course Prerequisites Credit in ECE 210
Course Directors Elyse Rosenbaum
Detailed Description and Outline

This course is intended to give juniors in Electrical and Computer Engineering an introduction to the design of analog and digital integrated circuits.

Topics:

  • Basic circuit analysis
  • Diodes
  • Transistors
  • Logic circuits
  • Amplifier circuits

Credit is not given toward graduate degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Computer Usage

Introduction to SPICE

Topical Prerequisities
  • Linear circuit analysis
  • Physics of diodes, bipolar-junction and field-effect transistors
Texts

Sedra and Smith, Microelectronic Circuits, 5th ed., Oxford University Press.

ABET Category

Engineering Science: 2 credits
Engineering Design: 1 credit

Course Goals

The goals of this course are as follows: Students will become familiar with the principles of non-linear circuit design, and sufficiently skilled at analysis of such circuits that they are prepared for advanced courses on integrated circuit design. Students will be able to differentiate between analog (linear) and digital circuits. For a given circuit configuration and DC bias, the students will be able to define gain, input/output resistance, and frequency response. Students will be aware of the non-ideal characteristics of bipolar and MOS transistors, and able to make design trade-offs to achieve a set of conflicting goals.

Instructional Objectives

A. By the time of Exam No. 1 (after about 15 lectures), the students should be able to do the following:

1. Use KCL/KVL and mesh/nodal analysis to calculate the voltages and currents in a network consisting of resistors, voltage and current sources, diodes. (a, b, m)

2. Describe the device structure and the I-V characteristics of Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MOSFETs). (a, j)

3. Calculate voltages and currents in a network consisting of resistors, voltage and current sources, and MOSFETS. (as, b, m)

4. Identify the logic function being implemented by a static CMOS logic circuit. (a, m)

5. Calculate the noise margins of a specified CMOS inverter. (a, e, m)

6. Estimate the propagation delay and power consumption of a static CMOS logic gate (a, e, j, m)

7. Design simple, static CMOS logic gates to meet a delay specification (c, m)

8. Use a commercial circuit simulator (e.g., HSPICE) to evaluate the static and transient performance metrics of a CMOS logic gate. Compare the results with those obtained from manual analysis. (j, k)

9. Describe the device structure and the I-V characteristics of Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs). (a, j)

10. Calculate the voltages and currents in a network consisting of resistors, voltage and current sources, and BJTs. (a, b, m)

B. By the time of Exam No.2 (after about 30 lectures), the students should be able to do all of the items listed under A, plus the following:

11. Define the basic characteristics of a generic amplifier such as the input and output impedances, current and voltage gain, and frequency response. (a, e, k, m)

12. Derive the small-signal (linear) model of a non-linear component (a, e, k, m)

13. Use the low-frequency small-signal model of a MOSFET in circuit analysis and identify the limits of the model. (a, e, j, k, m)

14. Use the low-frequency small-signal model of a BJT in circuit analysis and identify the limits of the model. (a, e, j, k, m)

15. Recognize the common source and common emitter amplifiers (including those with source [emitter] degeneration) and be able to calculate gain and input/output impedance. (e, k, m)

16. Apply Miller’s Theorem to estimate the frequency response of a generic amplifier. (e, k)

17. Find the operating frequency band of a particular common emitter or common source amplifier. (e, j, k, m)

18. Use a commercial circuit simulator to perform AC analysis. (k)

19. Derive (or estimate) the transfer function of an amplifier and draw its Bode plot. (a, e, k, m)

C. By the time of the Final Exam (after about 41 lectures), the students should be able to do all of the items listed under A and B, plus the following:

20. Recognize the source follower and emitter follower amplifiers and be able to calculate gain and input/output impedance. (e, k, m)

21. Find the operating frequency band of a particular common emitter or common source amplifier. (e, j, k, m)

22. Design a multi-stage amplifier to meet gain and bandwidth requirements for a given source and load impedance. (c, e, k, m)

23. Design a simple current source using MOS or bipolar transistors. (c, k)

24. Calculate the gain of a single stage amplifier with active load and identify the advantages of this configuration. (e, m)

22. Recognize a MOS differential amplifier and calculate its gain. Identify its advantages relative to a single-input amplifier. (e, j, k)

23. Construct a biasing network for an ideal op amp in the inverting or non-inverting configuration to achieve a specified gain. (k, m)

24. Identify the gain-bandwidth trade-off associated with feedback networks. (c, k, m)

Last updated: 9/25/2014