ECE 317
Introduction to ECE Technology & Management

Displaying course information from Spring 2014.

Section Type Times Days Location Instructor
B LEC 0800 - 0920 M W   2001   Leon Frizzell
Web Page http://courses.engr.illinois.edu/ece317/
Official Description Basic understanding of electrical and computer engineering concepts applicable to technology management. Circuit components; dc fundamentals; ac fundamentals; semiconductors; operational amplifiers; device fabrication; power distribution; digital devices; computer architecture (including microprocessors). Intended for the Business Majors in the Technology and Management program. Course Information: Credit is not given to Computer or Electrical Engineering majors. Prerequisite: One of MATH 220, MATH 221, MATH 234.
Subject Area Core Curriculum
Course Prerequisites Credit in MATH 220 or MATH 221 or MATH 234
Course Directors Leon A Frizzell
Detailed Description and Outline

To equip non-engineering business-oriented students with the technical skills to become competitive as businesspersons in a technology-driven market.

Topics:

  • Introduction to DC fundamentals
  • AC Fundamentals
  • Semiconductors
  • Operational Amplifiers
  • Photolithography
  • Digital Logic
  • Power Systems
  • Computer Architecture (including microprocessors)

A relatively low level of mathematical ability (first term calculus) is assumed. This course is designed for Business Majors in the Technology and Management program.
Credit is not given to students enrolled in Electrical or Computer Engineering.

Texts

Recommended text: Dick White and Roger Doering, Electrical Engineering Uncovered, Prentice Hall 1997.

Steven Schwarz and William Oldham, Electrical Engineering, 2nd edition, Harcourt, Brace, Jovanovick, 1993.

Course Goals

The goal of this course is to equip non-engineering business-oriented students with the technical skills to become competitive as businesspersons in a technology-driven market. To accomplish this goal, this course will aim to provide a basic understanding of electrical and computer engineering concepts. This course is designed for the business majors in the Technology and Management program.

A. After the first three weeks of class and the first two laboratory experiments, the students should be able to do the following:

1. Perform fundamental DC circuit calculations (a, c, e, k)

2. Measure voltage, current, resistance and power in DC circuits (b, d)

3. Begin to develop an appreciation for the basic terminology and method of thinking used by engineers (d,g)

B. After the first five weeks of class and laboratory experiment #3, the students should be able to do all of the items listed under A above, plus the following:

1. Perform fundamental AC circuit calculations (a, c, k)

2. Measure input and output waveforms in elementary AC circuits including transformers and diodes (b, d)

3. Begin to appreciate the operation of elementary electronics circuits (a,c,e)

C. After the first twelve weeks of class and laboratory experiment #4, the students should be able to do all of the items listed under A and B above, plus the following:

1. Perform basic analysis of semiconductor device performance, including diodes, bipoloar junction transistors, and field effect transistors (a, c, k)

2. Understand transistor amplification, and the difference between analog and digital configurations (a,c,e,k)

3. Perform basic logic operation analysis on combinational and sequential logic circuits (a, c, k)

4. Measure logic circuit performance (b, d)

D. After the full 15 weeks of class, the students should be able to do all of the items listed under A, B, and C above, plus the following:

1. Understand from a electrical engineering perspective the basic component blocks of a computer (a, c, k).

2. By virtue of the final project, to be able to communicate to a group of peers a technical ECE understanding of a modern technology in terms of the material learned throughout the semester (a,d,f,g,h,j,k)

Instructional Objectives

Program outcomes for ABET criterion:

(a) ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering

(b) ability to design and conduct experiments as well as to analyze and interpret data

(c) ability to design a system to meet desired needs

(d) ability to function on multi-disciplinary teams

(e) ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems

(f) understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

(g) ability to communicate effectively

(h) broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global/societal context

(i) recognition of the need for and ability to engage in life-long learning

(j) knowledge of contemporary issues

(k) ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice

(l) knowledge of probability and statistics, including applications to electrical/computer engineering

(m) knowledge of mathematics, and basic engineering sciences, necessary to carry out analysis and design

(n) knowledge of advanced mathematics (EE) and discrete mathematics (Comp E)

Last updated: 9/22/2014