ECE 439
Wireless Network

Displaying course information from Fall 2013.

Section Type Times Days Location Instructor
B3 LEC 1230 - 1345 T R   1109 Siebel Center for Comp Sci  Robin Kravets
B4 LEC 1230 - 1345 T R   1109 Siebel Center for Comp Sci  Robin Kravets
Web Page http://courses.engr.illinois.edu/ece439/
Official Description Overview of wireless network architectures including cellular networks, local area networks, multi-hop wireless networks such as ad hoc networks, mesh networks, and sensor networks; capacity of wireless networks; medium access control, routing protocols, and transport protocols for wireless networks; mechanisms to improve performance and security in wireless networks; energy-efficient protocols for sensor networks. Course Information: Same as CS 439. 3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite: CS 241 or ECE 391; one of MATH 461, MATH 463, ECE 313.
Course Prerequisites Credit in CS 241 or ECE 391
Credit in MATH 461 or MATH 463 or ECE 313 or STAT 410
Course Directors Nitin H Vaidya
Detailed Description and Outline

3 undergraduate hours. 3 or 4 graduate hours. Same as CS 439.

Course Goals

Course goals for ECE 439 Wireless Networks are to:

1. Develop an understanding of distinctions between wired and wireless networks, as well as differences between different types of wireless networks, such as mesh networks, ad hoc networks, cellular networks, and sensor networks.

2. Develop an understanding of medium access control protocols for wireless networks.

3. Develop an understanding of routing protocols for wireless networks.

4. Develop an understanding of the impact of wireless links on performance of transport layer protocols.

5. Provide a brief introduction to selected issues specific to sensor and cellular networks.

Instructional Objectives

ECE 439 combines lectures and assignments (including analytic problems, simulations, and hands-on assignments) to provide an understanding of various theoretical and practical issues in the context of wireless networks. The topics covered in the course can be divided into six segments: (1) introduction to wireless networks, (2) a brief overview of physical layer issues, (3) medium access control, (4) network layer issues, including routing and address assignment, (5) transport layer performance, and (6) issues in sensor and cellular networks.

1. At the completion of segment 1, the students should have a good understanding of different types of wireless networks, including infrastructure-based wireless local area networks, cellular networks, ad hoc networks, mesh networks, and sensor networks. They should also understand the distinguishing features of these networks, and also differences between wireless and wired networks. (e, j)

2. At the completion of segment 2, the students should have an understanding of important physical layer concepts that are useful in the understanding of the interaction between wireless physical layer and upper layer protocols. The topics covered include wireless path loss models, and wireless network capacity analysis. (a, e)

3. At the completion of segment 3, the students should have an understanding of the important issues in the design of medium access control protocols for wireless networks. The topics covered include notions of hidden and exposed terminals and their impact on protocol design, carrier sensing mechanisms in wireless networks, and impact of interference on transmission scheduling. (a, b, e)

4. Segment 4 covers network layer issues, particularly address assignment in mobile environments, and routing protocols. Routing protocol discussion covers Mobile IP extension to internet protocol, and routing in ad hoc networks, including proactive and reactive routing mechanisms. (a, e)

5. Segment 5 provides the students an understanding of the impact of packet losses due to wireless errors and mobility on performance of a transport protocol, particularly TCP. This segment also covers representative mechanisms for improving performance of TCP over wireless networks. (a, e, k)

6. At the completion of segment 6, the students will gain an understanding of selected issues specific to sensor networks, particularly energy efficiency and routing and cellular networks, particularly hand-offs and channel assignment. (a, e, k)

Last updated: 5/23/2013