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Brad Petersen
Director of
Communications
2052 ECE Building
306 N. Wright Street
Urbana, IL 61801
Phone: (217) 244-6376
bradp@illinois.edu

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Meg Dickinson
Communications Specialist
2016 ECE Building
306 N. Wright Street
Urbana, IL 61801
Phone: (217) 300-6664
megd@illinois.edu

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New ECE class gives students an in-depth look at the engineering process

New ECE class gives students an in-depth look at the engineering process

Starting this semester, ECE ILLINOIS will offer students an opportunity to study the engineering design process and possibly get a head start on their Senior Design projects with a new class called ECE 398, Special Topics in ECE.

Milosevic wins award for research on high-speed, low-power communications

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By Reema Amin, ECE ILLINOIS
January 25, 2012

  • ECE alumnus Pavle Milosevic received the Best Poster Paper Award at the recent IEEE Conference on Electrical Performance of Electronic Packaging and Systems.
  • Milosevic's poster gave a concise design of a transceiver that achieves low power use while retaining high-speed of communication between chips.
  • His presentation also included a computer simulation of a CMOS-based implementation of the design.

Pavle  Milosevic
Pavle Milosevic

ECE alumnus Pavle Milosevic (MSEE '07, PhD '11), who was a graduate student in ECE until completing his degree this past December, finished his ECE career on a high note with the “Best Poster Paper Award” at the IEEE Conference on Electrical Performance of Electronic Packaging and Systems (EPEPS) in San Jose, California, in the fall. The poster described his work on high-speed signaling systems.

The three-day conference hosted various events, including a poster presentation session.  Milosevic’s poster gave a concise design of a transceiver system that uses fundamental transmission-line modes for signaling.  With his design, low power usage can be achieved while maintaining the highest speed of communication between chips. 

“This design tackles real-life scenarios and can be applied to existing low-cost chip-to-chip communication systems,” Milosevic said.

Milosevic said the chips in devices like a cell phone or laptop can often have obstacles in maintaining good communication.  He added that the environment in which chips are embedded can cause some of these difficulties, with crosstalk between signaling lines limiting speeds and increasing power usage.

But, if a product’s chips can communicate virtually flawlessly, the most efficient power usage is attained by the product in question.

A number of other designs for efficient high-speed communication between chips have been proposed before his, Milosevic said, but so far, none have found widespread use in real-world products.

“There were four or five other approaches, but none of those can efficiently handle real-life problems,” Milosevic said. “The approaches are either too complex to implement or have limited efficiency, since they are not making full use of the underlying transmission line theory.”

His presentation also included a computer simulation of a CMOS-based implementation of the design.  Milosevic and his adviser, ECE Professor Jose E. Schutt-Aine, hope to receive a grant to create a physical design based on the simulation.

Schutt-Aine said his experience with Milosevic was “one of the best” he has had with a graduate student.
“He showed a lot of independence and a lot of creativity,” Schutt-Aine said.

Since graduating, Milosevic has begun work at Intel Corporation.

Editor's note: media inquiries should be directed to Brad Petersen, Director of Communications, at bradp@illinois.edu or (217) 244-6376.

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